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King Abdulaziz Mosque in Marbella

Just along the Highway N-340 in Marbella, out on Golden Mile you’ll see this stunning Mosque built by Prince Salman of Saudi Arabia, as the first mosque to be build after the Christians recaptured Spain in the fifteenth century and subsequent expulsion of the Moors from the Spanish continent.

The mosque was build to attend all the Muslim people living in and around Marbella. It is said that the mosque houses a selection of 30.000 books focusing on Koranic studies, and that it can hold service to more than 800 people. Beside the library and stunning iconic garden it also houses the Imam.

The Mosque is build by Córdoban Architect Juan Mora, inspired by contemporary Arabic Architecture.

We have been told that the mosque is open to public on saturdays to wednesdays 5 pm to 7 pm, but we haven’t been able to confirm this.

Art in Marbella

Marbella is a true mekka for art-nerds and people who have a genuine interest in old, new and contemporary art or who just like the local sketcher, sitting on the street.

We could write load of pages on how amazing each and every gallery is, but it would take up too much time and too much space! The best thing to do, is to take a look at this website ArteMarbella.com and start from one end of the town, visiting all the small galleries.

You can also visit the collection of Dali Sculptures at  Avenida del Mar on your way to the beach.

We’ll be happy to hear back from visitors, who have explored some of the places, to hear if it is worth a visit or if is just a time waister…

Dali Sculptures at  Avenida del Mar 2

Dali Sculptures at  Avenida del Mar

Museum of Spanish Contemporary Engravings Marbella

In the beginning of Casco Antiguo, the famous old town of Marbella, you’ll see the remains of the old city wall that once sourounded the entire city, protecting it from it’s enemies.

Right around here you’ll find the old now closed Hospital de Bazán also known as Hospital de la Encarnacion. The building was formerly the residential palace of Don Alfonso de Bazán a former Mayor of Marbella whom the street, Calle Hospital Bazán S/N also is named after. The house, which is believed to be from the 16th century, due to the big stone pillars and an elevated ceiling is build in several different architectural style such as Renaissance, Gothic, Mudejar and Medieval, as the constructions took place over several decades. The most visual architectural style is the one from late Medieval Spain.

When Don Alfonso de Bazán died and was placed to rest in the burial crypt for the Bazán family, who had lived in Marbella for centuries, his last will was opened. Here he donated his rather large house and two adjoining houses to the city, to be used as a hospital for the poor people. He also left money to modify the houses with the facility needed to run a hospital in the 1600 century.

Don Alfonso de Bazán also set up a Board of Directors to supervise the running and maintenance of the hospital, a task that was withhold until early in the 20th century. After this, the hospital was designated as an Andalucian Historical Monument and later turned into it’s present function, as museum of Spanish Contemporary Engravings and office for the Cultural Delegation of Marbella.

The museum is the first of its type in Spain and is for that alone, very famous. It exhibits paintings and works by Tapies, Chillida, Miró and Picasso just to mention a few of the very famous names. Each year the museum reveal 12 names of 12 of Spain’s new upcoming artists, who each will have one month during the year, dedicated just to display their latest work.

The museum also publish coffee table books with and about Spanish artists, the books can only be bought at the museum. On the museum’s website there’s an updated time schedule for the opening hours of the museum, which various depending on the season. There’s also a calendar where different events and exhibitions are posted – so remember always to check the website before heading to Marbella.

 

Address:
Museum of Spanish Contemporary Engravings
Calle Hospital Bazán S/N
29600 Marbella (Málaga)
Email: info@mgec.es
Website: http://www.mgec.es/
Tel.:(0034) 952 765 741

Map:
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